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Every time there’s a notable cybersecurity breach, someone (even me) writes a comprehensive primer on the proper way to create “secure” passwords. Lather, rinse, repeat. Until a few years ago, everyone (including me) based their password advice on a 2003 paper from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), with the catchy title “NIST Special Publication 800-63.” The paper recommended that passwords be cryptic, contain special characters, and be as close to nonsense as possible. I was in a camp I called “How to Make a Cryptic Password You Can Easily Remember.” The short version was this: take a phrase you know, such as a favorite quote from a movie, and use the first letter of each word. For example, Sheriff Brody’s famous line from Jaws, “I think we’re gonna need a bigger boat,” becomes [email protected] The trick was using Leet (a technique where letters ... (more)

The Game of Clouds 2017 | @CloudExpo #AWS #Cloud

The AWS Marketplace is growing at breakneck speed, with 40% more listings than last year. This and more insights were revealed when CloudEndure used their custom tool to quickly scan the over 6,000 products available on AWS Marketplace. The top offerings are highlighted in the image below but additional detail is available on their blog. "So whether you are a Stark, a Targaryen, or even a Lannister, the Game of Clouds map will help you attain the crown of AWS cloud computing perfection." (This content is being syndicated through multiple channels. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of GovCloud Network, GovCloud Network Partners or any other corporation or organization.) (Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2017) Follow me at http://Twitter.com/Kevi... (more)

How to enhance monitoring tools through critical alerting

  IT professionals rely on monitoring tools to let them know about events such as serious outages, downed servers or viruses. Monitoring tools are designed to send emails through standard protocols when any of these serious events occur in the infrastructure. However, when you can learn about incidents through monitoring tools, there is very little you can do to better manage the incident workflow. Moreover, if you receive alerts to a critical event via email, you can easily misjudge the email’s importance or not see the email altogether. The following white paper details five methods for improving your monitoring workflow through critical alerting. Critical alerting ensures your monitoring tools are no longer just a cloud-based ticketing system. This white paper- How to enhance monitoring tools through critical alerting details: 5 methods to transform incident man... (more)

WebRTC and The Remote Workforce Trend

We've been tracking the progress of WebRTC (real-time communication) since the API standard was first announced by Google two years ago, and in that time we've seen lots of predictions and promises about how this standard is going to disrupt the UC world. To make sense of these myriad views, it's important to understand two other business trends, namely BYOD (bring your own device) and the growing remote workforce.  BYOD may conjure up images of employees bringing their devices to work, but it's important to recognize that more and more work is happening outside the four walls of the business office. Although business owners want to accommodate employees' needs to work remotely and their desires to use their own smartphones and tablets to access email and other business applications, the need for secure and reliable voice and video communications remains imperative.... (more)

Why Microsoft Should Finally Buy Citrix

DISCLAIMER: This is long and the opinions are mine. I’ve written a good bit here about the various ways Microsoft and Citrix overlap in the hypervisor space, ranging from topics like shared code base through competition for the desktop space. To me, these two players have always been the underdogs battling for the right to go head-to-head against VMware in the main enterprise (and now cloud) virtual data center event. I’ve long said here that I think Microsoft is in the best position to make that move, but to be honest, Citrix currently has better technology. In other words, Microsoft has a better strategic play, Citrix a better tactical play. The announcements that came of out Synergy last week prove that. Citrix knows what it’s doing and they know how to build virtualization products to compete with VMware. As has been asked many times before, here and elsewhere:... (more)

WebRTC Summit Silicon Valley Call for Papers Now Open

The 3rd WebRTC Summit, to be held Nov. 4-6, 2014, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, announces that its Call for Papers is now open. Topics include all aspects of improving IT delivery by eliminating waste through automated business models leveraging cloud technologies. WebRTC Summit is co-located with 15th International Cloud Expo, 6th International Big Data Expo, 3rd International DevOps Summit and 2nd Internet of @ThingsExpo. WebRTC (Web-based Real-Time Communication) is an open source project supported by Google, Mozilla and Opera that aims to enable browser-to-browser applications for voice calling, video chat, and P2P file sharing without plugins. Its mission is "To enable rich, high quality, RTC applications to be developed in the browser via simple JavaScript APIs and HTML5." Help plant your flag in the fast-expanding business opportuni... (more)

Stress & Load Testing Web Apps (Even ADF & Apex) Using Apache JMeter

A couple of years ago I presented Take a load off! Load testing your Oracle Apex or JDeveloper web applications at OOW and AUSOUG. I can't recommend enough the importance of stress testing your web applications, it's saved my bacon a number of times. Frequently as developers, we develop under a single user (developer) model where concurrency issues are easily avoided. When our programs hit production, with just 1 more user, suddenly our programs grind to a halt or fall over in bizarre places. Result, pie on developers' faces, users' faith in new technologies destroyed, and general gnashing of teeth all round. Some simple stress and load tests can head off problems way before they hit production. (For the remainder of this post I'll infer "stress testing" and "load testing" as the same thing, though strictly speaking one tests for your application falling over, and t... (more)

Government Entities Adopt or Seek to Provide Cloud-Based Services

In this week’s cloud computing news we see some of the concerns in adopting this new paradigm, even as some of the largest business and government entities adopt (or seek to provide) cloud computing services. We can easily see vendors like Microsoft, Google, Oracle, HP, IBM, Unisys, and many others jockeying for position.  Having worked for a vendor I can state confidently that nowadays they make their moves based on demand, not “build it and they will come” wishful thinking. That demand is coming from your competitors, and sooner or later, those cost savings will show up in the form of more competitive pricing of goods and services making it more difficult to compete for those that don’t adopt these efficiencies. You can lead or you can follow.  Either way the world is moving on.  So, if you’re a small enterprise, why wouldn’t you adopt cloud computing now? GSA Inc... (more)

Oracle Told to Pay Google $1M in Java Trial Costs

Java trial judge William Alsup has ordered Oracle to pay $1,130,350 for Google's court costs, mostly for a court-appointed expert witness. Google, the "prevailing party," wanted $4,030,699, but the judge cut it back $2,900,349 refusing to accept its bill for third-party e-discovery. Oracle failed to convince the court and the jury that Android infringes its patents and copyrights. The judge ultimately ruled that its APIs weren't copyrighted. The judge's order recalls that "Oracle initially sought six billion dollars in damages and injunctive relief but recovered nothing after nearly two years of litigation and six weeks of trial." His decision explains in stiff language why "Oracle has failed to overcome the presumption of awarding costs to Google." "Oracle initially alleged infringement of seven patents and 132 claims but each claim ultimately was either dismissed ... (more)

Cloud Model 2014: Hybrid, Google, Brokerage, Startups and The Enterprise

2013 has been incredibly eventful for the cloud industry, mostly for making itself an eminent presence in the mainstream IT market. Businesses of all sizes have made their ways to the cloud, confirming my 2013 predictions. Government agencies worldwide take the cloud seriously, as demonstrated by the CIA's contract switch over to Amazon from IBM. AWS has proven its rapid pace of innovation and has introduced great leaders who have completely replaced the concept of sluggish IT servers with instances. While the market is still relatively small, I believe it will take over the IT market sooner than some of us think. I am not alone in my forecast... another analyst predicted that AWS will become a $50B business in 2015, which means it will multiply 12 times its size from last year. So, have a look at my 2013 predictions and read on to see what 2014 has in store for the... (more)

i-Technology Blog: Is There Life Beyond Google?

In one of my (several) former professional lives, I used to publish books about the future, including for example the world’s first full-length book about groupware. That was back in 1994 and the book was called Groupware on the 21st Century. If I’d been a clairvoyant I guess I would have called it simply The Future Is Google, but the Web hadn’t yet taken off, let alone Google, Inc. – mainly because Sergey Brin and Larry Page were both still only 21 years old. Fast-forward 12 years and how very much the landscape has changed. It turns out the world was neither flat, not round, but Google-shaped. Because much of what is said and done on the Web is currently said or done via Google. But what comes after Google? Where will the Web, the Internet, the whole nexus of telecommunications, i-Technology, and the quest for a better world, take us? My strong sense is as follows... (more)